What to do and see in Seraing, Belgium: The Best Places and Tips

December 23, 2017 Fernanda Pittenger

Seraing (French pronunciation: ​[səʁɛ̃]) is a Walloon municipality of Belgium in Province of Liege. The municipality of Seraing includes the old communes of Boncelles, Jemeppe-sur-Meuse, and Ougrée. With Liège, Herstal, Saint-Nicolas, Ans, and Flémalle, it forms the greater Liège agglomeration (600,000 inhabitants). To the south of Seraing are the Condroz and the Ardennes regions.
Restaurants in Seraing

1. Opera Royal de Wallonie-Liege

Place de l'Opera 25, Liege 4000, Belgium +32 4 232 42 41
Excellent
68%
Good
25%
Satisfactory
6%
Poor
0%
Terrible
1%
Overall Ratings

4.5 based on 149 reviews

Opera Royal de Wallonie-Liege

Founded in 1967, the association Opéra Royal de Wallonie-Liège is largely subsidized by the Wallonia-Brussels Federation, the City and Province of Liege. It is one of three major opera houses in Belgium. From the beginning, the institution occupies the Théâtre Royal de Liège, beautiful building loaned by the City of Liège (opened November 4, 1820). Its location in the heart of Liège and the Euregio, at the crossroads between Germany, the Netherlands, the Grand Duchy of Luxembourg and France, attracts a wide audience both Belgian and international.

Reviewed By DSC-NOVA - Fairfax, Virginia

We attended several Performances at the newly refurbished Opera royal de Wallonie and enjoyed every minute of it! The performance was first rate (the Italian sisters of Cav and Pag, set in production by tenor Jose Cura -- who also performed the lead in both of these short works.) It was magical!
The opera staff is friendly and goes out of its way to assist visitors; it was a delight working with them.
The opera house itself is not imposing in the foyer area; I'm not sure if the reconstruction is complete but it is very shallow and when we were there still covered with rough construction detailing. Inside the auditorium, it seems each seat must have good sightlines and the acoustics seemed wonderful.
Women's bathrooms, as is true in far too many places, were small and with too few stalls.
If opera is your thing and you are in Belgium when the Opera Royal has a production, it may well be worthwhile to visit and enjoy a wonderful evening of music.

2. Fly-in

Rue de l'Aeroport 8, Grace-Hollogne 4460, Belgium
Excellent
58%
Good
36%
Satisfactory
6%
Poor
0%
Terrible
0%
Overall Ratings

4.5 based on 30 reviews

Fly-in

Reviewed By Pat042 - Geneva, Switzerland

What a fantastic experience for kids or adults ... In a safe, but impressive, environment, you get the feeling of flying. Instructors are real professonals. An experience to live, really. The only very negative points is the "management" : trying to call several times without any success, getting a smile from the lady at the reception is a huge challenge, and the picture package is a way to get a bit more money but you will do better with your phone ... They probably think that because of their success, they don't need those basics things ... Anyway, congrats again to the instructors. Great Job combined with passion (we had the letton guy by the way).

3. Val Saint-Lambert Crystal Factory

Rue Deleval 245, Seraing 4100, Belgium
Excellent
28%
Good
59%
Satisfactory
4%
Poor
9%
Terrible
0%
Overall Ratings

4 based on 21 reviews

Val Saint-Lambert Crystal Factory

Reviewed By OlderGuy1956 - Dorchester, United Kingdom

If glassware is your thing - or you're interested in the history of industrial processes and skills - this is the place to be. The home of the famous Belgian crystal glass makers - Val St Lambert - this attraction combines a working factory with tours, museum and factory shop. Definitely do the tour - to see glass being blown - if you haven't seen it before - is amazing. Combine that with a browse round the shop (you'll need a BIG credit card) and the museum and it really is a fine way to spend half a day.

4. Ardennes American Cemetery and Memorial

Route N63 - 19 km SW of Liege | SE Edge of Village of Neupre, Neupre, Belgium
Excellent
78%
Good
19%
Satisfactory
3%
Poor
0%
Terrible
0%
Overall Ratings

4.5 based on 63 reviews

Ardennes American Cemetery and Memorial

Reviewed By Tupelo010835 - Denton, TX

A young soldier from my wife's hometown in Texas is buried here so we've been trying to get here for quite a number of years. Finally made it and found his grave. She put a small American flag on his grave.
The entrance to this cemetery is particularly moving. After leaving the parking lot and walking past the entry building you suddenly walk up on the thousands of perfectly aligned markers. If this doesn't bring a tear to your eye, nothing will.
We were particularly impressed with the quality and the thoroughness of the battle maps that are on display inside the entry building. Someone (several someone's) surely spent a tremendous amount of time researching, planning and executing this spectacular display. The attached photos don't do it justice but it will give you the general idea until you are able to visit.
Rest in Peace young soldiers.
Highly recommended

5. Eglise St-Jacques

Place Saint-Jacques 8, Liege 4000, Belgium +32 4 222 14 41
Excellent
61%
Good
35%
Satisfactory
3%
Poor
0%
Terrible
1%
Overall Ratings

4.5 based on 153 reviews

Eglise St-Jacques

Reviewed By MrFourPoundsWorth - Crawley Down, United Kingdom

I like Church Buildings that have more than a nod to what Christianity is all about.
To that end I was delighted with the exhibition which was on display here, with various Bible passages and scenes providing the artists with their inspiration.
The bright Sunshine and simple high level yellow windows cast fabulous shades across the floor and seats.

6. Coteaux de la Citadelle

Feronstree 92, Liege 4000, Belgium +32 4 221 93 67
Excellent
55%
Good
37%
Satisfactory
6%
Poor
1%
Terrible
1%
Overall Ratings

4.5 based on 569 reviews

Coteaux de la Citadelle

Reviewed By DSC-NOVA - Fairfax, Virginia

The Citadel in Liege refers to the remnants of the Liege fortification that formed the origins of this Belgium city. Much of the original stone framework has been destroyed; some has been incorporated into the modern city; another key section apparently was destroyed to allow the construction of a very large hospital toward the top of the highest hill. According to the blurb we read before heading off, the slopes are home to more than 60 historic monuments and five listed sites—but the spots are not particularly well-marked so identifying them is difficult. However, for those who need some fresh air and exercise, this place certainly fits the bill, especially since Liege is not known as a top-rated tourist destination and places to see and things to do can be somewhat limited.
So on one particularly fine, late September morning, armed with our trusty hotel city map, we decided to walk from the city center to the Citadel. We found absolutely no signs directing us to the place and were soon meandering around inside a quaint neighborhood featuring a narrow cobblestone road and no sidewalks—apparently some of the walls of the original fortress make up the backdrop. We didn’t pass anyone to ask for directions so we just kept heading upwards, assuming that eventually we would get the highest point of land and at least see the remnants in the vicinity. About 15 minutes in we found ourselves at the bottom of a steep set of steps without any markings. We climbed up and found ourselves at the Citadel park.
At the top is a large stone obelisk overlooking the town. We think the memorial was built to honor those who had been executed during World Wars I and II, but there is nothing explicit to verify. The memorial is simple and effective, the views of the city and river below pleasing. Behind the monument the space opened into a hiking area and so off we went to explore the entire space. Again we found no meaningful signs or directions and we passed only one jogger so we meandered until we reached the top, which is home to a very large, very populated, and very popular hospital.
We found no signs to indicate how to continue on to the other side of the park or, indeed, how to get back onto the Citadel’s hiking paths so we circumnavigated the hospital until we found an opening and trusted it to be the right path—at least it was going down. We also found—at last—an area map which indicated that there were two trails (purple and red) available but no indication which one we were on. We decided to just keep heading down and eventually noticed that every now and then a splotch of red paint would show up on a tree trunk or stone; eventually we were overtaken with school kids climbing of the path on well-worn shortcuts; toward the end was a teacher walking up the trail in high heels. We came out of the Citadel on school grounds (again, no signs) and made toward the general direction of where we thought the river might be—this was pretty much guesswork since it was difficult to find a reference point on the map. We might have given up and hailed a taxi but….this isn’t a tourist town so free-roaming taxis are not easy to spot. After a few missteps, we sighted the river, followed it for a way and then, and only then, saw a sign pointing to the city center.
We enjoy walking, especially in a nature zone, so except for a few moments of panic when we believed ourselves to be completely lost and heading out of country, we had a good time. A few signs would have been greatly appreciated. If you are not used to walking, ascending via the steps as we did might be a problem but there were no other folks around so definitely no need to rush. The downward trail had some steep spots to be aware of. In all, we spent around three hours (city center to city center). The only overview that we found was at the monument itself, where you can see most of the city and the river. We did not find any other identifiable points of interest (but then, we don’t think we did the entire loop so if we ever go back, we’ll try to do a better job of navigating to find all the gems others seemed to have found). Other than that, it is a pleasant walk.

7. Montagne de Bueren

Liege, Belgium
Excellent
49%
Good
43%
Satisfactory
6%
Poor
1%
Terrible
1%
Overall Ratings

4.5 based on 961 reviews

Montagne de Bueren

Reviewed By Patricia M

It takes some good 10-15 minutes to go up the stairs (373) but it’s a good physical as well as intellectual exercise ( try to count the stairs or find the pattern). Then , once you are up, you’ll have magnificent views of Liège and river Meuse. If you don’t want to go down the stairs again, you can take Rue Au Perì, that will take you to the historical centre of Liège.

8. Eglise St-Barthelemy (Church of St. Bartholomew)

Place Saint-Barthelemy, Liege 4000, Belgium +32 4 250 23 72
Excellent
49%
Good
45%
Satisfactory
5%
Poor
1%
Terrible
0%
Overall Ratings

4.5 based on 167 reviews

Eglise St-Barthelemy (Church of St. Bartholomew)

Reviewed By Trainbleu - Brussels

St. Bartholomew’s Collegiate Church (“Collégiale Saint-Barthélémy” in French) shows a strange mixture of styles. It was erected in the 11th and 12th century in Mosan Romanesque style, but was remodelled thoroughly in the 18th century. The twin towers were rebuilt in 1876. Still, with its original colours restored, St. Bartholomew’s looks appealing from the outside.
The white-washed 18th century interior came as a surprise and, on the whole, we found it rather disappointing. However the stunningly beautiful medieval baptismal font, which was transferred here from the demolished church of Notre-Dame-aux-Fonts, is well worth the 2 euro charged. For that price, visitors can view a video presentation lasting 10 minutes and examine at leisure the scenes represented on the brass or bronze basin, which is resting on elegant oxen.
On the square next to the church (“Place Saint-Barthélémy”) there is an interesting sculpture in weathering steel by Mady Andrien called “Les Principautaires” (1992). It represents a flock of bishops looking down on dancing little figures symbolising the people of Liege. A clear reference to the city’s past. The Fountain in the centre of the square is a memorial for local gunsmith Dieudonné Lambrecht, who set up an intelligence network in the First World War and faced a German firing squad at the La Chartreuse prison in April 1916.

9. La Boverie

Parc de la Boverie 3, Liege 4020, Belgium +32 4 238 55 01
Excellent
50%
Good
39%
Satisfactory
9%
Poor
1%
Terrible
1%
Overall Ratings

4.5 based on 251 reviews

La Boverie

A fine arts museum and a centre for international Exhibitions, in partnership with the Louvre.

Reviewed By SeimenBurum - Rotterdam, The Netherlands

Museum La Boverie is housed in one of the buildings that survived from the 1905 World Trade Fair. It was renovated between 2013-2016 and houses permanent and temporary Exhibitions . The permanent Exhibitions are a bit dull but when I visited there was a large exbition on comics for which Belgian and French artists are famous. There is a nice coffee shop with some food with outside Seating, weather permitting

10. Parc de la Boverie

Rue du parc, Liege 4020, Belgium +32 4 238 55 00
Excellent
43%
Good
50%
Satisfactory
5%
Poor
1%
Terrible
1%
Overall Ratings

4.5 based on 295 reviews

Parc de la Boverie

Reviewed By evanderhorrified - Glasgow, United Kingdom

Small but very pleasant park by the riverside. A short walk from the modern Calatrava designed railway station and not far from Mediacite shopping centre. City centre proper not to far away either.
Lots of locals enjoying the park in good weather,walking dogs etc.
Newly refurbished art gallery looks good..I didn't have time to visit.
A nice place to stroll or sit and watch the world go by.
Try and find the almost tame rabbits sun-bathing on the riverbank.
Nice place in an attractive city.

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